COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Begins Across the U.S.

Virginia in Phase 1b of Vaccination Rollout

Army Spc. Angel Laureano holds a vial of the COVID-19 vaccine, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., Dec. 14, 2020. (DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)

Photo by Lisa Ferdinando

Army Spc. Angel Laureano holds a vial of the COVID-19 vaccine, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., Dec. 14, 2020. (DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)

Molly Lynch and Brooke DiCicco

Bridgewater, Va. – As the Coronavirus progresses with new variants and continues to spread, the United States government and other nations have begun administering vaccinations.

According to MayoClinic, there have been two vaccinations that have received emergency-use authorization in the United States. Those vaccinations are called the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. 

Currently, the United States is operating in phases regarding the administration of vaccines. The CDC has recommended phases for states to follow. 

Virginia originally only included healthcare workers and residents at long-term care facilities, but now has released the state’s definitions of phases 1b and 1c in depth. According to VDH, all of Virginia is in phase 1b, which includes frontline essential workers, those 65 and older, those in group homes, and those with high-risk medical conditions.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam announced during one of his COVID-19 briefings on Feb. 17, that there is now a website to get registered for vaccination and a toll-free hotline [(877) 829-4682]

According to Bloomberg, 57.4 million vaccinations have been distributed throughout the United States — which means about 17% of the United States’ population has been vaccinated.

The CDC says that possible benefits of being vaccinated are preventing COVID-19, safely building immune protection and helping to stop the pandemic. Similar to the influenza vaccine, the CDC also says that if you were to get vaccinated and get COVID-19, the chances of getting severely ill are significantly less.

Campus’ opinion of the vaccine is mixed. Out of 48 participants in a poll conducted through Instagram, 39 stated that they would receive the vaccine eventually. However, 17 indicated that they would wait based on possible adverse reactions that happen to those vaccinated.

Currently, six of those who participated in the poll have been vaccinated already.

Sophomore Kate Dear believes the vaccination is important. 

“Personally, I have a younger brother with Down Syndrome,” said Dear. “Protect the herd.” 

Senior Olivia Carson is slightly nervous about the vaccine, but plans to get it anyway. 

“I’m happy to see the COVID-19 vaccine being released to so many people, I’m planning on getting it as soon as I am able to,” said Carson. “I am a little nervous to get it, my grandma has received her two doses and says it was painful but I’ll do whatever it takes to stay safe.”

Junior Lamont Jones stated he is “going to wait awhile, to see if it is really effective.”